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Win a copy of Sacred Gold for Linux! (finished)

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The contest is finished today and after a random.org draw, the winner was Manuel Bellersen! Manuel, you should contact us to give us the email you would like your gift to be sent to.
We want to thank you all for participating in our first ever contest in woGue, and wish you better luck on the upcoming exciting contests that we will soon be conducting again here!

The Game…

In his fortress of Shaddar-Nur, the necromancer Shaddar, a pariah of the Band of Mages from Mystdale Castle, plans his triumphant return to the world of Ancaria. To strengthen his magic powers, he summons a Sakkara Demon, whose power he will absorb himself. These Sakkara Demons rule over those damned to rot in hell, the undead. Not since the Era of the Gods have any of these creatures set foot in Ancaria, not since the Seraphim army drove them back to their dimension during the Wars of the Gods.

However, Shaddar’s experiment fails. The Sakkara Demon escapes and turns on his summoner…

In the south of the Kingdom, the village of Bellevue is beset by robbers and slave traders sent by the Sakkara Sect to find suitable victims for their unholy magic rituals. At the same time, the Kingdom is infiltrated by Goblins, forerunners of the Orcs of Khorad-Nur.
Under the command of Sergeant Treville, a loyal veteran of Prince Valor, the heroes first fight in the lands bordering the Orcish wastelands against attacks by the Goblins and the Orcs, who are leaving their desert in hordes and venturing ever deeper into the Kingdom of the dying King Aarnum.

The Contest…

The price is a copy of Sacred Gold for Linux that the winner will be able to download from desura for free. The contest finishes at September 16, Sunday GMT 20:00 when the winner will be selected and announced after a random.org draw.

To participate in the contest you will have to do two things:

  • Share the present article on Google plus, Facebook, or Twitter. Please use our post on socials for sharing
  • Leave a comment on the present article saying what you like or you don’t like in Gnome 3. You will have to use the same name as of your account on the socials of course

Good luck everyone!

Sacred Gold on LGP Sacred Gold on Desura

The free copy of Sacred Gold is a kind offering from Linux Games Publishing.

We really want your feedback about Gnome3, so please try to be short but right to the point :)


 
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  • http://twitter.com/varemenos Adonis K (Vαяēмēиøš)

    What i mostly don’t like about Gnome 3 is its notification system (it really needs reimplementation)

    • buddy guy

      If you hate the system, change it yourself

      • Ian Brunelli

        He don’t hate the system, he just dislikes the notification system.

    • Eleni

      I could not agree more. They say it will be fixed in 3.6. Let’s see.

  • Alfredo Hernández

    What I like the most about GNOME 3 is the Shell and the new HIG.

  • https://therealpadster.deviantart.com/ Padster

    My favourite thing about GNOME 3 is the integrated messaging.

  • http://www.facebook.com/airon90 Michael Moroni

    What do I dislike of GNOME 3? I dislike that it is too slow for my PC because of the graphic card. I’d like that GNOME people remember that many PCs are not new and people running older PCs should not find other solution in order to have a working DE

  • Ian Brunelli

    My two favorite things about Gnome 3 is 1) the unified interface and 2) the integrated apps.
    I just dislike the GMenu – not the idea, but is really hard to readapt old apps’s menus to this new concept. In this point I prefer the Unity’s Global Menu, that make this adaptation automatically.

  • SauravModak

    I love the integrated empathy in Gnome. Now I dont have to open a separate window for chat. Simple take the mouse and start replying, Thats amazingly fast, my friends get amazed by it. Lovely themes, icons make you customize Gnome to anything you like. And online account integration means things I have in Google Docs come to my desktop using documents. I am always connected on the move!

    The only thing I miss Facebook integration. Perhaps someone will make a Gnome shell extensions that allows on the fly facebook notifications on my desktop. And also update my status and tweets too.

    Gwibber is too slow and buggy for me.

  • http://profiles.google.com/marco.sting Marco Milone

    I really like the innovations of Gnome 3 and the integration with the on line accounts

  • Milozzy il Pocio

    I really like the innovations of Gnome 3 and the integration with the on line accounts

  • Darkika LaPotacia

    I like how it manages virtual desktops

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  • http://giako87.blogspot.it/ Giako

    My favourite thing about GNOME 3 is the way this DE is trying to achieve the future desktop

  • http://twitter.com/neuromancer85 Antonio Bonifacio

    The BEST thing in GNOME 3 is GTK3 :D

  • Manuel Bellersen

    What I like in Gnome 3 is … hard to say. I’m a KDE user and so haven’t been much inside Gnome. Recently I started it, looked around and got back to KDE. Its look is OK and it feels easy to use for average touchscreen internet users.

    The things I don’t like in Gnome 3 are much. I’m not average. I don’t do touchscreen. And I’m not just on the internet. I usually have lots of different windows open and don’t need to switch to a manager to switch to another. Same goes for virtual workspaces. There are more settings in KDE that I can tweak and with that I can customize my desktop the way I need for better productivity. I use a mouse. For that I don’t need big buttons like when using fingers. The whole interface looks like meant with touchcontrol in mind. Also Gnome always tries to hide something from me…

    But hey!
    Some users love it this way, others the other way. And everybody can do as he likes.

    (And now: crossing fingers to win ^__^)
    ((Btw.: Good luck to everyone!))

  • http://twitter.com/AlexVSharp Alex V.Sharp

    I really like making my desktop look and work the way I want it to look and work.

    GNOME3 simply lacks the options and functionality that I’ve gotten use to.

  • http://twitter.com/UGProject UbuntuGamingProject

    My favourite thing about Gnome 3 is the graphic interface, the great amount of downloadable themes and the possibility to add new lens and scopes for Unity.
    The worst thing is that desktop effects still make the system too slow.

  • AB

    Are you seriously offering proprietary software as a prize for participation in a competition to promote Gnome? The mind boggles..

    • alex285

      Yes, we support Open Source but we are not against proprietary software. I don’t see it like black and white. Both are necessary and can and _should_ co-exist.

      • AB

        > Both are necessary and can and _should_ co-exist.

        So it’s necessary for users to be denied the freedom to study how their computers work? It’s necessary for users to be threatened with fines or prison for trying to help their neighbours?
        Need I remind you that Gnome itself only exists because of a devotion to those very principles that you now so blithely and contemptuously dismiss? If the Gnome project has now abandoned those principles, then I for one will no longer have anything to do with it.

        • alex285

          I believe that everyone should have the freedom to distribute close-source. Ownership and distribution under personal preferences, it is a basic right of constitution in any democratic (free) country. But you are talking about Patents. Any Free Software is under restrictions of patents and copyrights. That’s a different issue.

          Personally I don’t believe that Open Source is a principle but is a need. Ideas always came out from our needs.

          • AB

            > I believe that everyone should have the freedom to distribute close-source

            Which means that users are expected to agree to restrictions that forbid them, under penalty of heavy fines or even imprisonment, from doing basically ethical and good things like studying how their own computers work, or sharing with their communities, or even verifying that a program respects the user’s privacy. There can be no freedom to distribute close-source, just as there can be no freedom to own slaves, because such a freedom depends on a restriction of the freedom of others.

            > Ownership and distribution under personal preferences, it is a basic right of constitution in any democratic (free) country.

            If I sell you something, I can’t impose restrictions upon you that forbid you from using what I sold you except in ways that I have personally approved.

            > But you are talking about Patents.

            No, I’m not.

            > Any Free Software is under of restrictions of patents and copyrights. That’s a different issue.

            This is just incoherent. Proprietary software is software under onerous and restrictive licenses, which are governed by copyright law, not patent law or trademark law.

            > Personally I don’t believe that Open Source is a principle but is a need. Ideas always came out from our needs.

            This is just a sneaky attempt to re-define the terms so that you can justify an unethical behaviour. If I steal your car, but then declare that I don’t believe that ownership is a principle, but is instead a need, and that my need outweighs yours, would you accept that no ethical violation took place? Yeah, I thought not.

            Free Software is first and foremost an ethical principle, entirely separate from Open Source, and that anyone affiliated with Gnome should be ignorant of that distinction is surprising, to say the least. Gnome was begun when the other principle desktop environment, KDE, used the then non-free QT library which made it an unacceptable choice for those who wanted a Free Software desktop.

          • alex285

            OK, I see where this goes. In my opinion FS (FSF) is more a political institution rather an organization about Free Software. Don’t get me wrong, but protesting so blindly against companies (etc etc) it actually harms Free Software. Moreover FSF seems to forget the free market and economic factors and acts like communist party.

            Yes Software is definitely a political issue. But I am out of it. However I am skeptical. First they force you to release your work for free (both as beer -profit model that FSF proposes isn’t working- and speech). What’s coming next?

            They always talk about ethics, but are they ethical themselves before trying to change the world? Besides who defines what is ethical and what is not? None force you to write or to buy proprietary software (I am not referring to Patents & Copyrights).

            What I like in Open Source is the communities. I am so out from these black and white ideologies. I think Open Source or Free Software (I don’t separate these two) will make it anyway, with them or without them. What I am trying to do, is to use open source where is possible, but I don’t exclude proprietary.

            And of course I respect your opinion and I am not saying you’re wrong and I am right.

          • AB

            > In my opinion FS (FSF) is more a political institution rather an organization about Free Software.

            Free Software is a political idea, so of course the organisation which established that political principle will be political in nature.

            > Don’t get me wrong, but protesting so blindly against companies (etc etc) it actually harms Free Software

            How can protesting against unethical behaviour harm Free Software? What evil was ever overthrown by spineless acquiescence?

            > Moreover FSF seems to forget the free market and economic factors and acts like communist party.

            Now this is a hoot! Large companies are using two government-granted monopolies, copyright and patents, to control users and to restrict trade. The Free Software Foundation’s position, that such monopolies ought to be severely weakened, is much closer to a free market position than the current prevailing business climate. Yet the apologists for proprietary software are so deluded as to defend government restriction of trade in the name of free markets!

            > They always talk about ethics, but are they ethical themselves before trying to change the world?

            Wait, trying to change the world is now unethical? Only cowardly submission to the current state of affairs is morally justifiable, is that it?

            > Besides who defines what is ethical and what is not?

            Typical relativistic nonsense, unworthy of this or any other discussion.

            > None force you to write or to buy proprietary software (I am not referring to Patents & Copyrights).

            Since copyright is the means by which software is proprietary, you can hardly talk about it without referring to copyright. Secondly, many people can’t use computers without access to some form of proprietary software, sometimes the Free Software community can’t write free replacements for all the proprietary software in the world. So many people are most certainly forced to use proprietary software.

            > I am so out from these black and white ideologies.

            And some of us are tired of people who hand-wave away the problem, proprietary software and the evils that come from it, out of some misplaced notion that letting companies walk all over us will somehow persuade them to stop walking all over us.

          • alex285

            > Since copyright is the means by which software is proprietary, you can hardly talk about it without referring to copyright.

            I mean you can “study” for example Ubuntu but you cannot re-distribute it. It is open source but it has copyrights. Same goes for art.

            > And some of us are tired of people who hand-wave away the problem

            All people are trying to improve their lives through society, other try more other less. Don’t blame the rest because they don’t try as hard as others. There are personal priorities for each person.

            >Free Software is a political idea, so of course the organisation which established that political principle will be political in nature.

            That’s I am saying. They try to run a political idea through a foundation about software. Why we should mix Gnome with politics? And mostly why should we mix Gnome with the fanaticism? Half of open source developers are against FSF and FSF is against open source developers. Do you think that this makes any good?

            > Now this is a hoot! Large companies are using two government-granted monopolies, copyright and patents, to control users and to restrict trade.

            FSF is running for 20 years. Things have gone much worse in the last 10 years (in software). FSF has failed in this area. Open Source on the other hand has grow huge in the last decade. I think the whole FSF purpose (not the free software!) is over. There are other forms of freedom. Piracy is one of them. Not in software, in anything. But there is piracy with the “blessing” of governments. Companies lose power year by year and societies evolve.

          • AB

            > I mean you can “study” for example Ubuntu but you cannot
            re-distribute it. It is open source but it has copyrights. Same goes for
            art.

            Wait, you think that we can’t redistribute Ubuntu now? And you are supposed to be knowledgeable about Free Software and Open Source. People most certainly can legally redistribute Ubuntu.

            > Don’t blame the rest because they don’t try as hard as others. There are personal priorities for each person.

            I’m not blaming people for not trying hard enough. I’m blaming you for making the problem worse by promoting proprietary software.

            > They try to run a political idea through a foundation about software. Why we should mix Gnome with politics?

            Because, as RMS says, you can leave politics alone, but politics won’t leave you alone. Copyright and patent law affect us, so we can either try to do something about it, or hide our heads in the sand and pretend that nothing is wrong.

            > And mostly why should we mix Gnome with the fanaticism? Half of open
            source developers are against FSF and FSF is against open source
            developers. Do you think that this makes any good?

            FSF is not against open source developers. Most of those who have expressed opinions against the FSF are either profoundly and massively ignorant about copyright law and the harm it’s doing, or they are the paid shills of proprietary software vendors. Without them, would it even be possible to have a free operating system? Without them, would there even be a Gnome?

            > FSF is running for 20 years. Things have gone much worse in the last 10
            years (in software). FSF has failed in this area. Open Source on the
            other hand has grow huge in the last decade.

            By whose measure have they failed? There is a lot more Free Software now than there was twenty years ago, and it’s now possible to run completely free software distributions. Thanks to their campaigning, millions of people are now aware of the insidious effects of copyright and patent law on computer software. The GPL remains the top free software license. As for Open Source being successful, that’s really a laugh. They have achieved success by ignoring the problem entirely. They have abandoned freedom as a principle in order to avoid upsetting those who make a profit from attacking freedom, and as a result, companies like Apple and Oracle can take their work and make non-free software with it.

            > There are other forms of freedom. Piracy is one of them. Not in
            software, in anything. But there is piracy with the “blessing” of
            governments. Companies lose power year by year and societies evolve.

            And this is rambling, incoherent gibberish. You are effectively refusing to support an organisation which campaigns to end unjust laws, while simultaneously calling for people to break these laws en-masse, making criminals of themselves, because that is somehow more palatable to you than having the moral courage to stand up for something good.

          • alex285

            >Wait, you think that we can’t redistribute Ubuntu now?

            I mean “Ubuntu’s trademark policy prohibits commercial redistribution of exact copies of Ubuntu, denying an important freedom”. by FSF

            >Because, as RMS says, you can leave politics alone, but politics won’t leave you alone.

            RMS has said lot of things that if we follow on them, we will return back to medieval ages.

            > By whose measure have they failed?

            Why you think FSF is important today? Most developers (15-25 years old) are ignoring FSF. GPL is the top free source license? In what terms? Most free software is released under LGPL or similar licenses..

            > ..companies like Apple and Oracle can take their work and make non-free software with it.

            Companies like Apple and Oracle have also contribute to open source.. but you distinguish OS from FS but anyway..

            > FSF is not against open source developers.

            Yes it is, because most open source developers (if not all) also work for companies that release propitiatory software..

            > Most of those who have expressed opinions against the FSF are either profoundly and massively ignorant about copyright law and the harm it’s doing

            I disagree. Many well known developers have said that RSM harms software with his fanaticism.. but people and fishes are in trouble when they open their mouth :)

            In my opinion Free Software isn’t important any more. It is already established as the primary technology to make software. What is more important today is the control of data. We don’t care how Facebook works (from software point of view), but we care how Facebook manages our data, and that we can’t export or delete them.

            I am not against FS or FSF, but I don’t like RMS vision about software or the means he uses to push his ideas. But as I said I am not against, I just don’t get bothered with it.

  • M4t3us

    I don’t like GNOME3… never did, probably never will. In their sad attempt at “reinventing the desktop” they have created nothing but a bloated carcass of a UI filled to the brim with good ideas gone horribly wrong.

    Does that count?!

    The Eternal GNOME 2.32 junky,
    Pedro “M4t3us” Mateus

  • Ben Smith

    Likes: Integration of chat, fairly nice consistent look, some applications (shotwell, firefox, thunderbird, libreoffice, gimp, chromium) – though all of these can be used on KDE with some extra libraries so it’s not that big of a plus, but the biggest plus to gnome is its stability and its seemingly larger community.

    Dislikes: Removal of common options (applications can be powerful and uncluttered if designed correctly), extremely big buttons and extra space everywhere that makes the screen appear smaller with less room for windows, weird system settings with missing options and dumbed down, bad menu (I liked the old Mint Menu implementation), Task manager now only showing the current selected window (makes it harder to multi-task with multiple windows open), and my BIGGEST dislike is the Nautilus file manager (horrible double click functionality – should more closely match Dolphin from KDE, double pane view removed as well as tabs, automatically copies files to new area instead of asking to move, copy, or link like KDE does, unable to easily configure the sidepane and remove unneeded entries or edit, large interface and buttons that leaves little room to view the actual files, and other small issues that leave me frustrated after using).

    I currently use KDE but if Gnome did a better job with making nautilus more usable, the interface less big and space wasteful, and easier to navigate several windows without using hotkeys or activities I would probably give it much more consideration.

  • The HUN

    I like in gnome gnome 3: apps, and integrated messaging.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1560369505 Arturo J. Puentes Castellanos

    I don’t like gnome 3 at all. Previuously i disliked KDE, but now it’s the only update Window Manager that it’s usable.

  • http://www.facebook.com/paulo.narciso.73 Paulo Narciso

    Gnome 3 looks like a cellphone OS.

    Most linux users run it on their PC’s, so focus on the potential of PC’s not cellphones.

    Your radical change from Gnome 2 to Gnome 3 won’t take that in mind.

    Go back to the drawing board, and use Gnome 2 as the starting point and evolve from that, I think a lot of people would be very happy with that.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1560369505 Arturo J. Puentes Castellanos

    What I like of Gnome 3 is that you can use javascript to write apps. Brilliant.

  • Aleksey Komarov

    I like new GNOME 3, especially GNOME Shell <3

  • geza benko

    simple and easy to use

  • Robert Kuszinger

    the gnome3 interface is revolutionary in the means of of space saving on your screen. This is clen, smple and not “polluted” so much with tools, graphical elements and so on.

    I don’t like that sometimes one some of my pcs in use it is unstable sttill.
    thanks
    Robert

    • Zoltan Hoppar

      I like gnome3 because in basics its an touch interface, but it has less options to control different apps window with keyboard. It should contain tiling option, and multiple screen handling with multiple monitors too. If tiling, and apps handling becomes usable from keyboard, and without mice, that will mean a lot for devs, and users too. What I don’t like that computer:/// part has a good option to work as control center, and no need for separated settings way. So if you logically sort the computer parts, including ramdiscs, and recognised drives with functions, that will mean revolution. KDE’s kio-slave integration in KDE is really awesome idea, so in basics, if you add the ability to add custom modules, extensions from gnome extensions page not only to system, else to the apps too – that will mean lot of flexibility. Think about conky – and it’s customizing possibilities.

  • joedaviso

    What I don’t like about GNOME 3 is its complete lack of options. Users are not welcome to modify its functionality or aesthetic, meaning that falling back to MATE or switching desktop environments is the only way to get control of the desktop back into the hands of users. GNOME needs another complete rewrite and it needs to follow the design principles of GNOME 2 or be completely rethought.

    (the connect with buttons aren’t working so my name here corresponds to my twitter)

  • fodor gyuri

    Overall I like Gnome3 but I switched to Cinnamon because of 2 annoying features. 1.) The integrated chat, good idea but it is annoying as hell when I try to chat whit pidgin, it always notifies me 2 times for every message. 2.) The bottom right corner, its not getting disabled when I’m using a full-screen wine program.

  • Александр Абаев

    Мне понравилось в GNOME 3 более интуитивное меню по с сравнению с предыдущей веткой. Да напоминает меню планшетов, но после другими DE не могу пользоваться. Очень был доволен, когда появились расширения, интерфейс стал более гибким. Мне нравится, что разработчики GNOME идут по пути инноваций, застой бы только вредил. Желаю вам побольше креативных идей и жду их в следующих ветках!

  • Richard Eszes

    I like in the Gnome3: beautiful appearance. I dont like: much to move the mouse on high resolution

  • http://www.facebook.com/tomplast Tomas Gustavsson

    I really love GNOME 3. It give me the minimalistic desktop I always sought for, without having to sacrifice any features.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tamas.szebeni.9 Szebeni Tamas

    with GNOME3 my problem is mainly about performance on my older machine, I don’t want to have such tools integrated into my desktop what I don’t want to use, earlier when I choosed GNOME for my desktop the reason for that was its small overhead comparing to KDE.

  • Adrià Arrufat

    What I like about GNOME 3 is the whole new approach. What I don’t like is the fact that it looks unfinished, but changelogs for future versions makes me thing it will change!

  • Manuel Bellersen

    Unbelievable!

    That’s so awesome!

    Thanks a lot!