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GNOME Games | An Experience That Feels Like A Paid-For Games-Suite!

mines-new

Mockups 4 days ago, by Allan Day,
https://github.com/gnome-design-team/gnome-mockups/tree/master/games

 

GNOME Games is a collection of fifteen small five-minute games in a variety of styles and genres. The last 1-2 years has begun an effort to modernize them [part2] (both interface & development parts), while the gameplay has changed a lot -on some of those- over the years.

I’ve spent endless hours on these games in the past, and I’am still keep playing 1-2 times a day, so I personally consider them a very important part of GNOME Project/Desktop ecosystem.

Mario Wenzel is one of the guys that maintain GNOME Games and he says a few interesting things about the problems and the future.

Paid-For Games-Suite Experience

mario-wenzel
Our fever-dream-goal is to free the games from your system theme and provide a game experience that feels like a paid-for games-suite.

Switching to dark themes (we have already done that in quadrapassel for 3.12) is simply the first and simple (and technically incomplete) step to a much larger idea.

Mario Wenzel

The expectations are high & the future is bright!


Mario Wenzel About GNOME Games

I am part of the games team and maintain a quarter of the 15 games under our wings. I speak for myself and how I see the direction of the discussions we currently have in our small team.

We have a big problem with the way our games are built. We usually have a game-view that is implemented in Clutter or as a Canvas and we have the surrounding controls that are pure Gtk.
Quadrapassel and Lightsoff use mostly deprecated Cairo methods for drawing their tiles. Tetravex has an intricate manual process of drawing on canvas and mines uses theme information to draw on a canvas.

This leads to several problems. Mines is unplayable without gnome-themes-standard and I guess also in some non gnome desktop-environments (I heard of one person not being able to get a proper theme in Xubuntu).

For the other games, we cannot easily extract theme information to generate a game design. We cannot generate tetris tiles from your theme information, chess pieces neither. So there was always going to be a mismatch between the game-view and the surrounding controls.

Looking at Nautilus or other core applications, one could imagine a theme providing an experience that is comparable or superior to the default theme(s). We can’t do that for all our games and their components, be it mahjongg-tiles, chess-tiles, tetris-tiles, dice and so on. This would be unfeasible for us, from a technical point, and unfeasible for the theme creators for a myriad of reasons. So we’re looking to take a different route and hope we will create an experience gnome can be proud of.

For the last months we have been working closely with Allan Day to create a unified games design and I am sure Allan will show the fruits of our labour on his blog, once we get the design proposals to a presentable state.

Our fever-dream-goal is to free the games from your system theme and provide a game experience that feels like a paid-for games-suite. Switching to dark themes (we have already done that in quadrapassel for 3.12) is simply the first and simple (and technically incomplete) step to a much larger idea.

We have lots and lots of ideas and plans for the future which we hope to shape into many design proposals in the following months.

I hope this clarified it a bit and feel free to ask in any direction you want. We are currently designing in a small group and not the whole mailing list but this is not to keep secrets but to keep the signal-noise-ratio low.

by Mario Wenzel


I’am realistic, and I have my own stupid reasons to believe that open source is the only way of writing software and that becomes more and more obvious every single day that passes.

I want to focus on what Mario said about the paid-for feel. While GNOME is superior on a lot of things over Windows & Mac OS X, it still has a long road to walk till it really becomes a “paid-for” like desktop.

Should we hope that GNOME will go to the “paid-for” level?

It is not a matter of hope. It is a matter of time.

However GNOME should find solutions to speed up things ..a little bit more. And by “solutions” I mostly mean that GNOME Foundation (on administration level), should give motivation & purpose to people to actively get involved to the project, and not just using it.

On an another step GNOME should re-think the deployment of Cloud Services, but this another story. As GNOME OS is another story too..


 
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